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FUN RESTAURANTS IN NYC

    restaurants

  • A place where people pay to sit and eat meals that are cooked and served on the premises
  • (restaurant) a building where people go to eat
  • (Restaurant (film)) Restaurant is a 1998 independent film starring Adrien Brody, Elise Neal, David Moscow and Simon Baker. Written by Tom Cudworth and directed by Eric Bross, Restaurant was the follow-up to this writing–directing duo’s first film, TenBenny, which also starred Adrien Brody.
  • A restaurant prepares and serves food, drink and dessert to customers. Meals are generally served and eaten on premises, but many restaurants also offer take-out and food delivery services. Restaurants vary greatly in appearance and offerings, including a wide variety of cuisines and service models.

    fun

  • Enjoyment, amusement, or lighthearted pleasure
  • violent and excited activity; “she asked for money and then the fun began”; “they began to fight like fun”
  • Playful behavior or good humor
  • A source of this
  • activities that are enjoyable or amusing; “I do it for the fun of it”; “he is fun to have around”
  • verbal wit or mockery (often at another’s expense but not to be taken seriously); “he became a figure of fun”; “he said it in sport”

    nyc

  • Pennsylvania Station — commonly known as Penn Station — is the major intercity train station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. It is one of the busiest rail stations in the world, and a hub for inboard and outboard railroad traffic in New York City.
  • New York is the most populous city in the United States, and the center of the New York metropolitan area, which is one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world.
  • .nyc is a proposed city-level top-level domain for New York City.
  • New York City

fun restaurants in nyc

fun restaurants in nyc – The Comfort

The Comfort Diner Cookbook: A World of Classic Diner Delights, from Homestyle Dinners to Satisfying Breakfasts and Fun Midnight Treats
The Comfort Diner Cookbook: A World of Classic Diner Delights, from Homestyle Dinners to Satisfying Breakfasts and Fun Midnight Treats
The motto at the Comfort Diner is a simple one: “Time to eat good food!”

And for Ira Freehof, owner of New York’s Comfort Diner, “good food” means fresh interpretations of classic American comfort food. Here he shares all the recipes that lure hungry types of all stripes into the cozy, bright booths of his restaurants, which have earned best-diner awards from Time Out New York and The Resident. Diner-inspired standards from Mom’s Meatloaf to perfect Macaroni and Cheese are covered, but so are newer dishes that have been eagerly adopted into the pantheon of American culinary favorites: Warm Taco Salad, Black Bean Quesadillas, Chinese Chicken Salad, and Three-Bean Vegetarian Chili. With recipes that both hearken back to the golden age of the diner and update the classics for today’s healthful living, this comfort food is truly family food that everyone will enjoy.

Because it’s always time to eat good food, The Comfort Diner Cookbook has irresistible recipes to fuel you from morning to midnight: substantial breakfasts (from Breakfast Burritos to Berry-Stuffed French Toast); sandwiches—traditional and with a twist (featuring the Cobb Salad Sandwich and the Thanksgiving-on-a-Roll Turkey, Cheddar, and Cranberry Melt); an entire delectable chapter devoted to grilled cheese—and another to thick milkshakes; a healthy helping of scrumptious salads; anytime small plates (such as Jalapeño Cheddar Cornbread and Shrimp with Bloody Mary Cocktail Sauce); satisfying big plates (including the ultimate Comforting Chicken Potpie); and divine desserts (with a heavenly Banana Cream Pie). Accompanying these surefire recipes is a wealth of lore about America’s favorite homestyle dishes and foodstuffs, along with a side of diner trivia and nostalgia, making this book as fun to read as it is rewarding to use.

NYC – LES: Mission Chinese Food New York – Tea Smoked Eel

NYC - LES: Mission Chinese Food New York - Tea Smoked Eel
Tea Smoked Eel with pulled pork trotter, Chinese celery, cheung fun and crisp fish skin.

Mission Chinese Food New York, at 154 Orchard Street, had a soft opening on Saturday, May 19, 2012. Chef Danny Bowien, born in Korea, but adopted and raised in Oklahoma, was named a semifinalist for the James Beard Rising Star Chef of the Year 2012 award. Like its San Francisco original, Mission Chinese maintains a social conscience, donating 75 cents from each main course Food Bank for New York City.

The opened in 2011 within Lung Shan Restaurant in San Francisco. Its origins trace to a sublet Guatemalan taco cart at 21st and Mission, where chef Anthony Myint and his wife Karen Leibowitz began selling their PB&J’s–pork-belly and jicama flatbreads–under the name Mission Street Food in 2008. fter a month’s worth of sellouts, they moved their operation into Lung Shan, a previously unremarkable Chinese takeout joint owned by Sue and Lian Zhou since 2002. Semiweekly, they would share the kitchen, serving creative upscale dishes. Soon they began inviting local chefs to choose a theme and collaborate on dishes, donating profits to local food pantries and soup kitchens. In July 2011, they rebranded themselves Mission Chinese and brought in chef Bowien, who filled the menu with a quirky, responsibly sourced take on Chinese cooking. When Bowien expanded east, he left the original location in the hands of his sous-chef Jesse Koide.

Mission Chinese Food New York, at 154 Orchard Street, had a soft opening on Saturday, May 19, 2012. Chef Danny Bowien, born in Korea, but adopted and raised in Oklahoma, was named a semifinalist for the James Beard Rising Star Chef of the Year 2012 award. Like its San Francisco original, Mission Chinese maintains a social conscience, donating 75 cents from each main course Food Bank for New York City.

The opened in 2011 within Lung Shan Restaurant in San Francisco. Its origins trace to a sublet Guatemalan taco cart at 21st and Mission, where chef Anthony Myint and his wife Karen Leibowitz began selling their PB&J’s–pork-belly and jicama flatbreads–under the name Mission Street Food in 2008. fter a month’s worth of sellouts, they moved their operation into Lung Shan, a previously unremarkable Chinese takeout joint owned by Sue and Lian Zhou since 2002. Semiweekly, they would share the kitchen, serving creative upscale dishes. Soon they began inviting local chefs to choose a theme and collaborate on dishes, donating profits to local food pantries and soup kitchens. In July 2011, they rebranded themselves Mission Chinese and brought in chef Bowien, who filled the menu with a quirky, responsibly sourced take on Chinese cooking. When Bowien expanded east, he left the original location in the hands of his sous-chef Jesse Koide.

Nourishing NYC’s The Art of Eating Well: A Gallery Event

Nourishing NYC’s The Art of Eating Well: A Gallery Event
Photos are courtesy of Photographer and visual artist Dorian Sky Wolff . Dorian has pursued art and music since motion and voice were granted him. Currently living and working in Manhattan, NY, he produces visual and aural art that is appreciated in many walks of life. You will often find Dorian at Manhattan’s night spots shooting celebrity musicians and most recently in The Hampton’s working 0n creative collaborations with America’s top leading bands.

What a success! Nourishing NYC’s The Art of Eating Well: A Gallery Event to benefit the Junior Chef Program is getting rave reviews, and it’s all thanks to you and contributions from our sponsors to our program.

Here is our list of amazing sponsors, make sure to show them love.

Adriana Marie

Astor Center

BAO Food and Drink

Beecher’s Handmade Cheese

Calvin Klein Home

Chelsea Piers

Dorian Wolff

Dr. Hansen

NACE-NY

NJ Devils

NY Jets

Per Se

Rao’s Restaurant

Red Frog Events

Sentry Centers

Sign Expo

Swarovski

The Shubert Organization

TY KU

William Bennett Gallery

East Village Wines

85 West

Etrusca Restaurant

The View Restaurant

Battery Place Market

On behalf of the Nourishing NYC Board of Directors, I want to extend a heart-felt thank you for your commitment to making this event so successful. It was the vision of the Board of Directors and the Planning Committee to provide the best program available in a pleasant, comfortable environment. Your generous contribution helped make our vision a reality by providing the extras that make everything so much fun and by helping to offset the cost of holding the program.

As we continue to grow, please know that partnerships with our sponsors are vital to the success of this organization. You are truly appreciated. Thanks again.

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